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Beware of "Michael Chin Tries To Flee - Captured At The Border" Fake News

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Beware of "Michael Chin Tries To Flee - Captured At The Border" Fake News

DO NOT visit the website www.impulsecyberbites.com. The is because, the website, which goes by the name "Impulse Cyberbites," is a fake news website that is spreading misleading information about famous people to trick online users into visiting it or drive web traffic to it. One such victim of the "Impulse Cyberbites" fake news is Jamaican billionaire banker, Michael Lee-Chin. According to Jamaica's local newspapers, The Gleaner, "Michael Lee-Chin is said to be stunned by the attempt of fraudsters using his name and image to lure unsuspecting individuals to click on an advertisement, and who themselves become pawns in an online scheme to generate revenues from clicks."

Please continue below.

The people behind the fake news website drive traffic to it by creating online advertisements that display unauthorized photos of Mr. Lee-Chin with the following messages:

  • Michael Chin Tries To Flee - Captured At The Border
  • MLC Wanted In Connection With Release Of Private Video impulsecyberbites.com
  • "Bounty On Michael Chin - Wanted Dead Or Alive"
  • "Big Corporations Put A Bounty On Him After Release Of Classified System"
  • "Michael Chin Kidnapped Tortured For Selling Secret"
  • "NIB Abducts MLC Following Release Of Secret Video"

If curious online users click on the advertisements, they will be taken to the fake news website, where they will be shown false and misleading information about Mr. Lee-Chin.

Lee-Chin's secretary Trish Trombetta told The Gleaner that Mr. Chin's lawyers have contacted Google to have the false and misleading advertisements created by the people behind the "Impulse Cyberbites" website flagged and removed.

Again, online users are warned to stay away from fake news website www.impulsecyberbites.com, because fake news websites help create public mischief, chaos, spread misinformation, and trick online users into visiting phishing, spam, and malicious websites.

We do not know who the owners of the fake news website are because they hide their identities and contact information using Whois Guard. Whois Guard is a service that hides the identity of the owner of a domain or website name. The same service also hides contact information.

Please share with us what you know or ask a question about this article by leaving a comment below. Also, check the comment section below for additional information, if there is any.

Remember to forward malicious or phishing email messages to us at the following email address: info@onlinethreatalerts.com

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