Is True Watt a Scam? Review of the Energy Saving Device

Is True Watt a Scam? Review of the Energy Saving Device

True Watt is another energy-saving device scam. I am a professional electrician and have worked in the field for many years, even had an electrical contractor's license. I spent my greatest number of years in the field working as an electrical technician and troubleshooter and I can tell you that everything in a building, be it a house or otherwise, requires so much power and you get billed for the amount of power you consume, not for capacity, current or anything else.

The True Watt Website

True Watt

There is a power equation and you can manipulate any part of the equation but on the other side of that equation, you will have total power needed or consumed and that will not change, unless you want things not to work or wear out sooner than they were designed to.

I can get a 120V light bulb to work for at least a short while, but if the voltage is too much, the thing will burn out. I can play around with the current but things will either not work or stop working soon.

There is really only one way for anyone to save on electricity and that is not to use it, period. If anyone really wants to save on electricity, then use only one or just a few solar panels to create your own electricity. Solar panel systems can be custom-designed to serve the needs of just one or a few circuits but one does not need to spend $20,000 for an entire house system. A product like True Watt is not going to get you anywhere.

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Comments (Total: 8)

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  • December 5, 2022 at 10:54 AM by an anonymous user from: Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada

    Thank you for this candid assessment

  • November 23, 2022 at 5:27 PM by an anonymous user from: St Clair, Swansea, Illinois, United States

    Yeah..this product doesn't work...buy solar panels instead... sounds like a sales pitch for solar

  • November 16, 2022 at 5:31 PM by an anonymous user from: Henniker, Weare, New Hampshire, United States

    there is no free lunch.

  • November 16, 2022 at 4:03 PM by an anonymous user from: Charlotte, North Carolina, United States

    What utility company do you represent?

  • November 12, 2022 at 9:51 AM by an anonymous user from: San Luis Obispo, California, United States

    8 weeks is not 120 days.

  • November 10, 2022 at 3:36 PM by an anonymous user from: Downtown Redmond, Redmond, Washington, United States

    this review doesn't pass the smell test!

  • November 7, 2022 at 6:52 PM by an anonymous user from: Wayne, Livonia, Michigan, United States

    They offer a 90 day (3 months) guarantee. But it may take 120 days (8 weeks) to "work". Not a good sign that it's any good, except to end up in a landfill.

    • November 11, 2022 at 3:50 PM by an anonymous user from: Windham, Ashford, Connecticut, United States

      8 weeks is 56 days, not 120.

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Is True Watt a Scam? Review of the Energy Saving Device