3 Types of Data You'd Present in a Stacked Chart

A stacked chart is a type of chart that displays data as a stack of bars, columns, or lines. This type of chart is ideal for comparing different parts of a whole. To create a stacked chart, you will need to first create a bar chart or column chart. Then, you will need to add a series to the chart for each type of data that you want to display.

3 Types of Data Youd Present in a Stacked Chart

For each series in stacked charts, you will need to specify the types of data that they represent. For example, let's say that you want to create a stacked chart that displays the percentage of men and women in different age groups. You would first create a bar chart or column chart with two series: one for men and one for women. Then, you would need to add a series for each age group. For each series, you would need to specify that it represents the percentage of men or women in that age group.

There are many types of data that can be presented in a stacked bar chart. The most common are sales data, budget data, and employee data.

Sales Data

Sales data is a term used to refer to the data collected by businesses about their sales. This data can include information about the products or services sold, the customers who bought them, and the sales process itself. Sales data can be used by businesses to track their sales performance over time, identify market trends, and make decisions about product lines, marketing strategies, and even about removing bottlenecks in the sales process.

Budget Data

Budget data is the record of all financial transactions made by a company or individual over a specific period of time. This data can be used to track spending, income, and other financial information. There are many different ways to use budget data. Some of the most common ways are to track spending, create a budget, and find ways to save money.

Employee Data

Employee data is any data related to employees, whether it's their name, contact information, job title, or salary. This data is often collected and used by employers to manage their workforce. Employee data can also be used for marketing purposes, such as targeted email campaigns or targeted ads, and figuring out beneficial ways to use such data is an important part of any digital transformation.

How To Create A Stacked Chart In Excel

Chart In Excel

To create a stacked chart in Excel, follow these steps: 1. Create a table with the data you want to use in your chart. 2. Select the data in the table and insert a stacked column chart. 3. In the chart, select the data series you want to stack. 4. In the Format Series pane, select the Stack Columns check box. 5. Click OK.

Presenting A Stacked Chart In Excel

When creating a stacked chart in Excel, there are three main ways to represent your data types. 1. The percentage of a whole that is represented by each data point. 2. The cumulative total of all data points up to and including that data point. 3. The difference between the values of adjacent data points. For example, you can use your stacked chart presentation to show quarterly sales data for a company over the past three years. The percentage of a whole that is represented by each data point can be displayed in a stacked chart by stacking the data points on top of one another. This gives a visual representation of the relative size of each data point. The cumulative total of all data points up to and including that data point can be displayed in a stacked chart by stacking the data points on top of one another and using a different color to represent the cumulative total. This gives a visual representation of how the total sales have increased or decreased over time. The difference between the values of adjacent data points can be displayed in a stacked chart by stacking the data points on top of one another and using a different color to represent the difference. This gives a visual representation of how the sales have changed from one quarter to the next.

Ultimately, stacked charts have more niche uses than many other popular chart types, but if you need to quickly demonstrate the relationships between multiple data points in a meeting, they may be your ideal choice.

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3 Types of Data You'd Present in a Stacked Chart