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Fake and Malicious HSBC Bank Emails Claim Fraudulent Activities Detected

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Fake and Malicious HSBC Bank Emails Claim Fraudulent Activities Detected

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The email messages below, which claim that fraudulent activities were detect on the recipients' HSBC Bank accounts, are fakes and contain malicious attachments that will infect the recipients computers with virus or a Trojan horse, if open. Once infected, the Trojan horse will create a back-door on the victims' computers that will allow cyber-criminals to spy on them, and steal their personal and financial. The cyber-criminals may also use Trojan horse to take control of their computers, which they will use for other fraudulent purposes.

The Fake and Malicious Email Message

Subject: Detected fraudulent activity
Attachment: Suggested_prescriptive_Brian Reynolds.zip

Dear Customer,

Please note that Your account and the bank card were detected to be involved in financial fraud operations. As a result, Your account is to be placed on restricted status. Consequently, cash withdrawal will also be restricted.

Kindly see enclosed the further instructions to avoid mentioned sanctions.

Brian Reynolds,
Future Applications Specialist
HSBC Bank PLC.

Subject: Exposed fraud manipulation
Attachment: Anti-fraud_measures_Kayli Schulist.zip

Dear Customer,

Please note that Your account and the bank card were detected to be involved in financial fraud operations. As a result, Your account is to be placed on restricted status.

Consequently, cash withdrawal will also be restricted. Kindly see enclosed the further instructions to avoid mentioned sanctions.

Kayli Schulist,
Senior Response Manager
HSBC Bank PLC.

Remember, never open an email attachment that has a name ending with ".zip" from a suspicious email message or from an email message that you were not expecting.

Click here for a list of email attachments that you should never open, regardless of where they came from.

Note: Some of the names, addresses, email addresses, telephone numbers or other information in samples on this website may have been impersonated or spoofed.

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Fake and Malicious HSBC Bank Emails Claim Fraudulent Activities Detected