National Institute for Health and Care Excellence - Fake Virus Cancer Test Email

The email message below: "We have been sent a sample of your blood analysis for further research. During the complete blood count (CBC) we have revealed that white blood cells is very low, and unfortunately we have a suspicion of a cancer," is a fake or hoax. The email message was not sent by The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and was designed to trick the recipients into opening the attachment, which is not a document with a CBC test results, but a virus or malware that will infect the recipients’ computers if it is open.

National Institute for Health and Care Excellence - Fake Virus Cancer Test Email

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) Fake Cancer Test Email

We have been sent a sample of your blood analysis for further research. During the complete blood count (CBC) we have revealed that white blood cells is very low, and unfortunately we have a suspicion of a cancer.
Dear (users email)
We have been sent a sample of your blood analysis for further research. During the complete blood count (CBC) we have revealed that white blood cells is very low, and unfortunately we have a suspicion of a cancer.

Wite Blood cells:  1200 Low
Hemoglobin: 12 Normal
Platelets: 19000 Low

We suggest you to print out your CBC test results and interpretations in attachment below and visit your family doctor as soon as possible
Sincerely,
Dr.Moon Earnest
Dr. Avery Ernie

Again, this email message was not sent by National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), but by cybercriminals, whose aim is to trick the curious or frighten recipients into opening the malicious attachment that will infect their computers with a virus or Trojan horse.

NICE is aware of this scam and you can click here to visit their website for more information.

Once your computer has become infected with this malicious Trojan horse, the cybercriminals behind this email message will be able to access and take control of your computer remotely from anywhere around the world. They may spy on you, use your computer to commit cybercrimes, or steal your personal and financial information.

Now, if you have already opened the malicious attachment, please do a full scan of your computer with the antivirus software installed on it. The name of the attachment may change, so be careful when opening email attachments. 

If you don’t have antivirus software installed on your computer, please click here for a list of free antivirus software.

Never open an attachment that has a name ending with “.exe”, because these are computer programs that can infect your computer with a virus or some other malware. And, do open attached Zip or RAR files in an email message, unless you are not expecting one from someone. These are compressed files with names ending with “.zip” and “.rar”.

Click here for a list of email attachments you should never open, regardless of where they came from.

For a list of other virus email messages, please click here.

This fake email message is similar to the Coutts Private Bank Services Transaction and Notification and Lloyds Bank Transaction Notification email messages.

Check the comment section below for additional information, share what you know, or ask a question about this article by leaving a comment below. And, to quickly find answers to your questions, use our search Search engine.

Note: Some of the information in samples on this website may have been impersonated or spoofed.
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  • March 24, 2014 at 9:28 AM by an anonymous user from: Gillette, Wyoming, United States

    I live in America and just received this message, but was immediately suspicious as I have not had any blood tests recently. Also, it said "Dear email" and didn't know the name of the recipient

  • March 18, 2014 at 1:47 PM by an anonymous user from: London, England, United Kingdom

    Received this email today. Luckily I haven't had any blood tests lately or...

    However, it's a wicked person that uses the "cancer" word to elicit a response.

  • March 18, 2014 at 8:40 AM by an anonymous user from: Birmingham, England, United Kingdom

    I have just received this email and lucky did not open

    The attachment . But I have just recently had

    Blood tests ... How did they know?

    Are they on the national health records viewing

    Patients details?

    • March 22, 2014 at 8:11 AM by info

      It is a coincidence. The scammers send these emails to thousands of persons. Even persons living in other countries, who do not know or even heard of NICE.

    • March 18, 2014 at 1:02 PM by an anonymous user from: Zutphen, Gelderland, Netherlands

      I too received this shocking email today, and also had tests done last week but I'm sure it must be just a coincidence. Do you happen to live in the Netherlands?

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National Institute for Health and Care Excellence - Fake Virus Cancer Test Email